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CBOT 1993 video

1 633 views | 13 Nov. 2020

1993 CBOT promotional

1993 CBOT promotional video about futures markets and how the trading floor operates.

John Shepley

Those were great days!

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How To Code A Breakeven With cTrader

1 334 views | 3 Dec. 2017

This video will show you

This video will show you how to code a breakeven stop loss to an existing automated strategy robot (cBot), it follows on from the algorithmic trading school for beginners.

Ahmet Yaşar Özer

Line #276 in the breakeven code is illogical. Firstly, you may still want to use breakeven when stop-loss is in place (There would be nothing wrong with that). Secondly, if that line evaluates to false (stop-loss is null), then if statements in line #287 and line #295 always evaluate to true, therefore those two if statements are totally unnecessary.

ClickAlgo

At some point in the video I am copying and pasting text from the snippet file, my apologies as I left the window on my other monitor, but it is pretty self explanatory. If you want to visit the algo school for beginners just follow this link: https://clickalgo.com/cTrader-algorithmic-trading-school-for-beginners

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Chicago: Board of Trade

1 257 views | 22 Oct. 2019

The Chicago Board of Trade

The Chicago Board of Trade (CBOT), established on April 3, 1848, is one of the world's oldest futures and options exchanges. More than 50 different options and futures contracts are traded by over 3,600 CBOT members through open outcry and electronic trading. Volumes at the exchange in 2003 were a record breaking 454 million contracts. On July 12, 2007, the CBOT merged with the Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME) to form the CME Group. CBOT and three other exchanges (CME, NYMEX, and COMEX) now operate as designated contract markets (DCM) of the CME Group.

The concerns of U.S. merchants to ensure that there were buyers and sellers for commodities have resulted in forward contracts to sell and buy commodities. Still, credit risk remained a serious problem. The CBOT took shape to provide a centralized location, where buyers and sellers can meet to negotiate and formalize forward contracts.

In 1864, the CBOT listed the first ever standardized "exchange traded" forward contracts, which were called futures contracts. In 1919, the Chicago Butter and Egg Board, a spin-off of the CBOT, was reorganized to enable member traders to allow future trading, and its name was changed to Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME).

On October 19, 2005, the initial public offering (IPO) of 3,191,489 CBOT shares was priced at $54.00 (USD) per share. On its first day of trading the stock closed up +49% at $80.50 (USD) on the NYSE.

In 2007, the CBOT and the CME merged to form the CME Group.

In 2012, the CBOT expanded electronic trading hours to 22 hours per day to become more competitive in the industry. The open outcry hours remained the same.

Since 1930, the Chicago Board of Trade has been operating out of 141 West Jackson Boulevard, Chicago, in a building designed by architects Holabird & Root that is 605 feet (184 m) tall, the tallest in Chicago until the Richard J. Daley Center superseded it in 1965. This Art Deco building incorporates sculptural work by Alvin Meyer and is capped by a 31-foot (9.5 m) tall statue of the Roman goddess Ceres in reference to the exchange's heritage as a commodity market. Ceres is often claimed to be faceless because its sculptor, John Storrs, believed that the forty-five story building would be sufficiently taller than any other nearby structure and as a result that no one would be able to see the sculpture's face anyway. However, this popular rumor was disproved, with the sculptor intending to give the statue an ethereal and god-like look by being faceless.

On May 4, 1977, the Chicago Board of Trade Building was designated a Chicago Landmark. The building is now a National Historic Landmark.

The pit is a raised octagonal structure where open-outcry trading takes place. Operating during regular trading hours (RTH), the CBOT trading floor contains many such pits.

The steps up on the outside of the octagon and the steps down on the inside give the pit something of the appearance of an amphitheater, and allow hundreds of traders to see and hear each other during trading hours. The importance of the pit and pit trading is emphasized by the use of a stylized pit as the logo of the CBOT. The Pit is also the title and subject of a classic novel (1903) by Frank Norris.

Trades are made in the pits by bidding or offering a price and quantity of contracts, depending on the intention to buy (bid) or sell (offer).

This is generally done by using a physical representation of a trader's intentions with his hands. If a trader wants to buy ten contracts at a price of eight, for example, in the pit he would yell "8 for 10", stating price before quantity, and turn his palm inward toward his face, putting his index finger to his forehead denoting ten; if he were to be buying one, he would place his index finger on his chin. If the trader wants to sell five contracts at a price of eight, they would yell "5 at 8", stating quantity before price, and show one hand with palm facing outward, showing 5 fingers. The combination of hand-signals and vocal representation between the way a trader expresses bids and offers is a protection against misinterpretation by other market participants. For historical purposes, an illustrated project to record the hand signal language used in CBOT's trading pits has been compiled and published.

With the rise of electronic trading the importance of the pit has decreased substantially for many contracts, though the pit remains the best place to get complex option spreads filled.

Clemtonian G.

Stunningly beautiful building. Would luv to see the top floors. Older Art Deco is the best!!